Announcing the publication of MURMURATIONS

cropped-murmurations_cvr_final.jpg

The accessible yet skillfully created poems of this collection will be enjoyed by newcomers to the riches of poetry as well as experienced readers. In this, his second collection, Art Nahill writes about fear, family, and redemption in language and imagery that speak plain truths. Each poem stands alone but like the starlings of his titular poem coalesce into a larger, surprising, and mesmerizing whole.

“Murmurations is a fine collection of poems. In their joys lurks sorrow, and in their sorrows, a wet-eyed smile… They throb with the music of human thought.”

-Glenn Colquhoun

Available in print and e-format from Amazon and in Auckland at Unity Books! You can also purchase a copy via the PayPal button on the sidebar to the right or leave a message request above and we can post a copy to you. Books are $20 plus shipping.

 

Commitment (from Murmurations)

One of the most difficult tasks I have as a hospital-based doctor is to assess an individual’s capacity to make decisions for themselves when they are suffering from dementia. When someone lacks this capacity it is sometimes necessary to place them in supported care (e.g. rest home or private hospital) against their will which can be harrowing for both ‘the patient’ and for me.

images
Photo by Diana Alsindy (Dianablography@wordpress.com)

 

White hair                                                                                                                                     frames her face                                                                                                                              riddled                                                                                                                                              with effort.

The blue sea                                                                                                                                          of her hospital gown                                                                                                                    spattered                                                                                                                                          with egg and oatmeal                                                                                                     archipelagoes.

It’s 1964                                                                                                                                               (it’s not).

I’m her husband                                                                                                                              (I’m not)

come                                                                                                                                                       to take her home again                                                                                                              (never again).

She’s lived                                                                                                                                             in that house for more                                                                                                                   than a lifetime, she says. Planted                                                                                                    all the roses.

Her mind is a boat                                                                                                                        listing badly—

I consign her                                                                                                                                             to the sea.

Multitudes (from Murmurations)

As a physician, friend, and family member, I have witnessed many deaths. This poem is a contemplation of the many quiet, unseen ways those deaths have affected me.

34039652543_b5995c8740_b

I carry many deaths                                                                                                                     inside me though                                                                                                                              not as a cat is said to

or a saint bristling                                                                                                                          with arrows.                                                                                                                                      Not as an oak

in winter flies                                                                                                                                      its few brown flags                                                                                                                              of surrender.

Not the way the womb                                                                                                                sheds its lush red lining.                                                                                                                 Not the way a virus storms

the cockpit of a cell                                                                                                                           but the way a man                                                                                                                    feeding pigeons in the park

watches each evening                                                                                                                        as they wander off                                                                                                                        when his hands are empty.